From angel to office worker : middle-class identity and female consciousness in Mexico, 1890-1950 / Susie S. Porter.

By: Porter, Susie S, 1965- [autor.]
Material type: TextTextSeries: The Mexican experiencePublisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2018Description: xvi, 351 páginas : ilustraciones, fotografías ; 23 cmContent type: texto Media type: sin medio Carrier type: volumenISBN: 9781496204219; 9781496206510; 9781496205780; 9781496206497; 9781496206503Subject(s): Mujeres -- Empleos -- México -- Historia -- Siglo XX | Secretarias -- México -- Historia -- Siglo XX | Mujeres de clase media -- México -- Historia -- Siglo XXLOC classification: HD6101 | .P67Classification:
Contents:
List of Illustration. List of Graphs and Tables. Acknowledgments. List of Abbreviations. Introduction. 1. "Women of the Middle Class, More Than Others, Need to Work". 2. Office Work and Commercial Education during the 1920s. 3. Writing and Activism in 1920s Mexico City. 4. Women at Work in Government Offices in 1930s Mexico City. 5. Commercial Education and Writing during the 1930s. 6. Office Workers Organize during the 1930s. 7. Women, Work, and Middle-Class Identity during the 1940s. Conclusion. Notes. Bibliography. Index.
Summary: "In late nineteenth-century Mexico a woman's presence in the home was a marker of middle-class identity. However, as economic conditions declined during the Mexican Revolutionand jobs traditionally held by women disappeared, a growing number of women began to look for work outside the domestic sphere. As these "angels of the home" began to take office jobs, middle-class identity became more porous.<BR /><BR /> To understand how office workers shaped middle-class identities in Mexico, From Angel to Office Workerexamines the material conditions of women's work and analyzes how women themselves reconfigured public debates over their employment. At the heart of the women's movement was a labor movement led by secretaries and office workers whose demands included respect for seniority, equal pay for equal work, and resources to support working mothers, both married and unmarried. Office workers also developed a critique of gender inequality and sexual exploitation both within and outside the workplace. From Angel to Office Workeris a major contribution to modern Mexican history as historians begin to ask new questions about the relationships between labor, politics, and the cultural and public spheres."-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "To understand how office workers shaped middle-class identities in Mexico, From Angel to Office Worker examines the material conditions of women's work and analyzes how women themselves reconfigured public debates over their employment"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Préstamo general Biblioteca Gerardo Cornejo Murrieta
Acervo General
Libro HD6101 .P67 (Browse shelf) Ej. 1 Available 61489

Incluye referencias bibliográficas (páginas 305-339) e índices.

List of Illustration. List of Graphs and Tables. Acknowledgments. List of Abbreviations. Introduction. 1. "Women of the Middle Class, More Than Others, Need to Work". 2. Office Work and Commercial Education during the 1920s. 3. Writing and Activism in 1920s Mexico City. 4. Women at Work in Government Offices in 1930s Mexico City. 5. Commercial Education and Writing during the 1930s. 6. Office Workers Organize during the 1930s. 7. Women, Work, and Middle-Class Identity during the 1940s. Conclusion. Notes. Bibliography. Index.

"In late nineteenth-century Mexico a woman's presence in the home was a marker of middle-class identity. However, as economic conditions declined during the Mexican Revolutionand jobs traditionally held by women disappeared, a growing number of women began to look for work outside the domestic sphere. As these "angels of the home" began to take office jobs, middle-class identity became more porous.<BR /><BR /> To understand how office workers shaped middle-class identities in Mexico, From Angel to Office Workerexamines the material conditions of women's work and analyzes how women themselves reconfigured public debates over their employment. At the heart of the women's movement was a labor movement led by secretaries and office workers whose demands included respect for seniority, equal pay for equal work, and resources to support working mothers, both married and unmarried. Office workers also developed a critique of gender inequality and sexual exploitation both within and outside the workplace. From Angel to Office Workeris a major contribution to modern Mexican history as historians begin to ask new questions about the relationships between labor, politics, and the cultural and public spheres."-- Provided by publisher.

"To understand how office workers shaped middle-class identities in Mexico, From Angel to Office Worker examines the material conditions of women's work and analyzes how women themselves reconfigured public debates over their employment"-- Provided by publisher.

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